Here is one of the plates made for my homage to “The Dinner Party:”
Ida B. Wells (1862-1931) was a journalist, a suffragist, and a staunch activist against the terrible plague of black lynchings in the South.
When she was 21, she took a train in which her tickets instructed her to sit at about the middle of the train.  Once she was settled down, a man with the train company came to her to ask her to please move.  She knew he wanted to remove her and put her in the train car for all black passengers.  She refused, showing her ticket to her rightful place.
Then the conductor came, and Wells still refused.  Suddently, the conductor took her with one hand in an attempt to physically remove her—and she bit him!
She later sued the company and won the case.
Now that’s what I call a BAMF.

Here is one of the plates made for my homage to “The Dinner Party:”

Ida B. Wells (1862-1931) was a journalist, a suffragist, and a staunch activist against the terrible plague of black lynchings in the South.

When she was 21, she took a train in which her tickets instructed her to sit at about the middle of the train.  Once she was settled down, a man with the train company came to her to ask her to please move.  She knew he wanted to remove her and put her in the train car for all black passengers.  She refused, showing her ticket to her rightful place.

Then the conductor came, and Wells still refused.  Suddently, the conductor took her with one hand in an attempt to physically remove her—and she bit him!

She later sued the company and won the case.

Now that’s what I call a BAMF.